The trial

The verdict

What is the “verdict”?

The verdict is the decision that is made at the end of the trial about whether you are guilty or not guilty.

Who decides what the verdict will be?

Juries Act 1981, s 29C

If the trial is before a judge alone, it is up to the judge to make this decision. If there is a jury, the judge will advise the jury about the law that must be applied to the case, and the jury must decide whether you are guilty or not guilty. The court can accept a majority verdict from the jury – this is where the decision is agreed to by all but one of the members of the jury.

What happens if I am found guilty?

If you are found guilty, you will be sentenced for committing the crime (see “Sentencing” in this chapter).

What happens if I am found not guilty?

If you are found not guilty, the charge will be dismissed and you will be free to go.

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